Дорогие пользователи и гости сайта. Нам очень нужны переводчики, редакторы и сверщики. Мы ждем именно тебя!
Добро пожаловать, Гость
Логин: Пароль: Запомнить меня

ТЕМА: Sarah MacLean - A Rogue by Any Other Name - отрыв

Sarah MacLean - A Rogue by Any Other Name - отрыв 18 Апр 2014 22:57 #1

  • MariCova
  • MariCova аватар
  • Не в сети
  • Luero
  • Сообщений: 3
  • Репутация: 0
A Rogue by Any Other Name: The First Rule of Scoundrels

Sarah MacLean


Часть 2


Chapter Two
Dear M—
You absolutely must come home. It’s dreadfully boring without you; neither Victoria nor Valerie makes for a sound lakeside companion.
Are you very sure that you must attend school? My governess seems fairly intelligent. I’m sure she can teach you anything you need know.
Yrs—P
Needham Manor, September 1813
* * *
Dear P—
I’m afraid you’re in for dreadful boredom until Christmas. If it is any consolation, I don’t even have access to a lake. May I suggest teaching the twins to fish?
I’m sure I must attend school . . . your governess is not fond of me.
—M
Eton College, September 1813
Late January 1831
Surrey
Lady Penelope Marbury, being highborn and well-bred, knew that she should be very grateful indeed when, on a frigid January afternoon well into her twenty-eighth year, she received her fifth (and likely final) proposal of marriage.
She knew that half of London would think her not entirely out of bounds if she were to join The Honorable Mr. Thomas Alles on one knee and thank him and her maker for the very kind and exceedingly generous offer. After all, the gentleman in question was handsome, friendly, and had all his teeth and a full head of hair—a rare combination of traits for a not-so-young woman with a broken engagement and only a handful of suitors in her past.
She also knew that her father, who had no doubt blessed the match at some point prior to this moment—as she stared down at the top of Thomas’s well-appointed head—liked him. The Marquess of Needham and Dolby had liked “That Tommy Alles” since the day, twenty-some-odd years ago, when the boy had rolled up his sleeves, hunkered down in the stables of her childhood home, and assisted in the whelping of one of the marquess’s favorite hunting dogs.
From that day on, Tommy was a good lad.
The kind of lad that Penelope had always thought her father would have liked for his own son. If, of course, he’d had a son, instead of five daughters.
And then there was the fact that Tommy would someday be a viscount—a wealthy one, at that. As Penelope’s mother was no doubt saying from her place beyond the drawing-room door, where she was no doubt watching the scene unfold in quiet desperation:
Beggars cannot be choosers, Penelope.
Penelope knew all this.
Which was why, when she met the warm brown gaze of this boy-turned-man she’d known all her life, this dear friend, she realized that this was absolutely the most generous offer of marriage she would ever receive, and she should say yes. Resoundingly.
Except she didn’t.
Instead, she said, “Why?”
The silence that followed the words was punctuated by a dramatic “What does she think she is doing?” from beyond the drawing-room door, and Tommy’s gaze filled with amusement and not a little bit of surprise as he came to his feet.
“Why not?” he replied, companionably, adding after a moment, “We’ve been friends for an age; we enjoy each other’s company; I’ve need of a wife; you’ve need of a husband.”
As reasons for marrying went, they weren’t terrible ones. Nevertheless, “I’ve been out for nine years, Tommy. You’ve had all that time to offer for me.”
Tommy had the grace to look chagrined before he smiled, looking not a small bit like a Water Dog. “That’s true. And I haven’t a good excuse for waiting except . . . well, I’m happy to say I’ve come to my senses, Pen.”
She smiled back at him. “Nonsense. You’ll never come to your senses. Why me, Tommy?” she pressed. “Why now, Tommy?”
When he laughed at the question, it wasn’t his great, booming, friendly laugh. It was a nervous laugh. The one he always laughed when he did not wish to answer the question. “It’s time to settle down,” he said, before cocking his head to one side, smiling broadly, and continuing, “Come on, Pen. Let’s make a go of it, shall we?”
Penelope had received four previous offers of marriage and imagined countless other proposals in a myriad of fashions, from the glorious, dramatic interruption of a ball to the private, wonderful proposal in a secluded gazebo in the middle of a Surrey summer. She’d imagined professions of love and undying passion, profusions of her favorite flower (the peony), blankets spread lovingly across a field of wild daisies, the crisp taste of champagne on her tongue as all of London raised their glasses to her happiness. The feel of her fiancé’s arms around her as she tossed herself into his embrace and sighed, Yes . . . Yes!
They were all fantasy—each more unlikely than the last—she knew. After all, a twenty-eight-year-old spinster was not exactly fighting off suitors.
But surely she was not out of line to hope for something more than, Let’s make a go of it, shall we?
She let out a little sigh, not wanting to upset Tommy, who was very clearly doing his best. But they’d been friends for an age, and Penelope wasn’t about to introduce lies to their friendship now. “You’re taking pity on me, aren’t you?”
His eyes went wide. “What? No! Why would you say such a thing?”
She smiled. “Because it’s true. You pity your poor, spinster friend. And you’re willing to sacrifice your own happiness to be certain that I marry.”
He gave her an exasperated look—the kind of look that only one very dear friend could give another—and he lifted her hands in his, kissing her knuckles. “Nonsense. It’s time I marry, Pen. You’re a good friend.” He paused, chagrin flashing in a friendly way that made it impossible to be annoyed with him. “I’ve made a hash of it, haven’t I?”
She couldn’t help herself. She smiled. “A bit of one, yes. You’re supposed to profess undying love.”
He looked skeptical. “Hand to brow and all that?”
The smile became a grin. “Precisely. And perhaps write me a sonnet.”
“O, fair Lady Penelop-e . . . Do please consider marrying me?”
She laughed. Tommy always made her laugh. It was a good quality, that. “A shabby attempt indeed, my lord.”
He feigned a grimace. “I don’t suppose I could breed you a new kind of dog? Name it the Lady P?”
“Romantic indeed,” she said, “but it would take rather a long time, don’t you think?”
There was a pause as they enjoyed each other’s company before he said, suddenly very serious, “Please, Pen. Let me protect you.”
It was an odd thing to say, but he’d failed at all the other parts of the marriage proposal process, so she did not linger on the words.
Instead, she considered the offer. Seriously.
He was her oldest friend. One of them, at least.
The one who hadn’t left her.
He made her laugh, and she was very, very fond of him. He was the only man who hadn’t utterly deserted her after her disastrous broken engagement. Surely that alone recommended him.
She should say yes.
Say it, Penelope.
She should become Lady Thomas Alles, twenty-eight years old and rescued, in the nick of time, from an eternity of spinsterhood.
Say it: Yes, Tommy. I’ll marry you. How lovely of you to ask.
She should.
But she didn’t.
* * *
Dear M—
My governess is not fond of eels. Surely she’s cultured enough to see that simply because you arrived bearing one does not make you a bad person. Loathe the sin, not the sinner.
Yrs—P
post script—Tommy was home for a visit last week, and we went fishing. He is officially my favorite friend.
Needham Manor, September 1813
* * *
Dear P—
That sounds suspiciously like a sermon from Vicar Compton. You’ve been paying attention in church. I’m disappointed.
—M
post script—He is not.
Eton College, September 1813
The sound of the great oak door closing behind Thomas was still echoing through the entryway of Needham Manor when Penelope’s mother appeared on the first-floor landing, one flight up from where Penelope stood.
“Penelope! What have you done?” Lady Needham came tearing down the wide central staircase of the house, followed by Penelope’s sisters, Olivia and Philippa, and three of her father’s hunting dogs.
Penelope took a deep breath and turned to face her mother. “It’s been a quiet day, really,” she said, casually, heading for the dining room, knowing her mother would follow. “I did write a letter to cousin Catherine; did you know she continues to suffer from that terrible cold she developed before Christmas?”
Pippa chuckled. Lady Needham did not.
“I don’t care a bit about your cousin Catherine!” the marchioness said, the pitch of her voice rising in tune with her anxiety.
“That’s rather unkind; no one likes a cold.” Penelope pushed open the door to the dining room to discover her father already seated at the table, still wearing his hunting clothes, quietly reading the Post as he waited for the feminine contingent of the household. “Good evening, Father. Did you have a good day?”
“Deuced cold out there,” the Marquess of Needham and Dolby said, not looking up from his newspaper. “I find I’m ready for supper. Something warm.”
Penelope thought perhaps her father wasn’t at all ready for what was to come during this particular meal, but instead, she pushed a waiting beagle from her chair and assumed her appointed seat, to the left of the marquess, and across from her sisters, both wide-eyed and curious about what was to come next. She feigned innocence, unfolding her napkin.
“Penelope!” Lady Needham stood just inside the door to the dining room, stick straight, her hands clenched in little fists, confusing the footmen, frozen in uncertainty, wondering if dinner should be served or not. “Thomasproposed!”
“Yes. I was present for that bit,” Penelope said.
This time, Pippa lifted her water goblet to hide her smirk.
“Needham!” Lady Needham decided she required additional support. “Thomas proposed to Penelope!”
Lord Needham lowered his paper. “Did he? I always liked that Tommy Alles.” Turning his attention to his eldest daughter, he said, “All right, Penelope?”
Penelope took a deep breath. “Not precisely, Father.”
“She did not accept!” The pitch at which her mother spoke was appropriate only for the most heartbreaking of mourning or a Greek chorus. Though it apparently had the additional purpose of setting dogs to barking.
After she and the dogs had completed their wails, Lady Needham approached the table, her skin terribly mottled, as though she had walked through a patch of itching ivy. “Penelope! Marriage proposals from wealthy, eligible young men do not blossom on trees!”
Particularly not in January, I wouldn’t think. Penelope knew better than to say what she was thinking.
When a footman came forward to serve the soup that was to begin their evening meal, Lady Needham collapsed into her chair, and said, “Take it away! Who can eat at a time like this?”
“I am quite hungry, actually,” Olivia pointed out, and Penelope swallowed back a smile.
“Needham!”
The marquess sighed and turned to Penelope. “You refused him?”
“Not exactly,” Penelope hedged.
“She did not accept him!” Lady Needham cried.
“Why not?”
It was a fair question. Certainly one that everyone at the table would have liked to have answered. Even Penelope.
Except, she did not have an answer. Not a good one. “I wanted to consider the offer.”
“Don’t be daft. Accept the offer,” Lord Needham said, as though it were as easy as that, and waved the footman over for soup.
“Perhaps Penny doesn’t wish to accept Tommy’s offer,” Pippa pointed out, and Penelope could have kissed her logical younger sister.

Подлец под любым другим именем ( Серия Правила Негодяев)
Дорогой М,
Ты, безусловно, должен приехать. Без тебя здесь ужасно скучно; Виктория и Валерия неподходящая компания для прогулок у озера.
Ты уверен, что тебе нужно посещать школу? Моя гувернантка мне кажется достаточно образованной. Я уверенна, она может тебя научить всему, что тебе нужно знать.
Твоя П.
Поместье Нидхам, Сентябрь 1813.
* * *
Дорогя П.,
Я боюсь, тебе будет ужасно скучно до Рождества. Если тебя это утешит, у нас тут даже озера нет. Может, научишь близняшек рыбачить?
М.
Коллежд Энтон, Сентябрь 1813.
* * *
Конец Января 1831
Суррей, Великобритания.
Будучи знатного происхождения и хорошего воспитания Леди Пенелопа Мербури знала, что она действительно должна быть благодарна, когда одним холодным январским днем, в свои двадцать восемь лет, она получила пятое, и скорее всего последние, предложение руки и сердца.
Она знала, что пол Лондона не сочло бы ее выжившей из ума, если бы она присоединилась к уважаемому мистеру Томасу Элиасу встав на одно колено рядом с ним, в благодарность за его чрезвычайно щедрое предложение. В конце концов, упомянутый джентльмен был красив, дружелюбен, все зубы у него были на месте и полная копна волос- редкое сочетание этих качеств для не совсем уж молодой девушки с неудавшейся помолвкой и совсем небольшим количеством ухажеров в прошлом.
Когда она смотрела на опущенную голову Томаса, она так же знала, что ее отцу, заблаговременно благословившему этот брак, он нравился. Маркизу поместья Нидхам и Долби нравился «этот Томми Элиас» с того самого дня, когда около двадцати с лишним лет назад мальчик, сидевший на корточках в конюшнях, закатал свои рукава и помог произвести на свет детенышей одной из любимой охотничьей маркиза. С того самого дня Томми был хорошим парнем.
Пенелопа думала, что Томми был таким парнем, каким бы ее отец хотел, что бы был его сын. Если бы у него были сыновья, вместо пяти дочерей. И потом, был еще тот факт, что когда-нибудь Томми станет Виконтом- и, достаточно состоятельным. Это утверждала ее мать без тени сомнения, со своего места, за дверями гостиной, откуда она, несомненно, наблюдала за разворачивающейся сценой в тихом отчаянии. «У нищих нет выбора, Пенелопа». Пенелопа знала это.
Именно поэтому, когда он встретила взгляд его глаз, это мальчика, превратившегося в мужчину, которого она знала всю свою жизнь, она поняла что это, безусловно, самое щедрое предложение о замужестве которое она когда либо получит, и что она должна сказать да. Не раздумывая. Только она этого не сделала. Вместо этого, она спросила «Зачем?».
Последовавшая после ее слов тишина была прервана драматическим возгласом «Она что сошла сума?» из-за дверей гостиной; Когда Томми поднялся на ноги, его взгляд выражал изумление и никакого удивления. «Почему бы и нет?», ответил он дружески, добавив через мгновение: «Мы друзьями с самого детства, нам нравиться компания друг друга; Мне нужна жена, вам нужен муж». Озвученные поводы для женитьбы, были не такими уж ужасными. Тем нимение, «Я выхожу в свет уже девять лет, Томми. Все это время у тебя была возможность сделать мне предложение». Прежде чем улыбнуться, Томми хватило изящества, что бы выглядеть огорченным, и не выглядеть как мокрая собака: «Это правда. И у меня нет хорошего оправдания ожидания, кроме... в общем, я рад сообщить, что я пришел в себя, Пэнни». Она улыбнулась ему: «Ерунда. Ты никогда не прейдешь в себя. Почему я? Почему сейчас, Томми?» настаивала она. Когда он засмеялся в ответ, это не был его обычный громкий и дружеский смех. Это был нервный смех. Тот, которым он смеялся, когда не хотел отвечать на вопрос. «Пора осесть», ответил он, перед тем как склонить голову набок, широко улыбаясь, и продолжил: «Давай, Пэнни. Дай нам шанс, ну же?»
Пенелопа получила предыдущие четыре предложения о замужестве и представляла бессчетное количество последующих, разнообразных по манере: от великолепного, драматического прерывания бала к частному, и замечательному предложению в уединенной беседке посереди Суррейского лета. Она представляла декларации о любви и о неумирающей страсти, изобилие ее любимых цветов (Пионов), покрывал, бережно расстеленных посреди поля дико растущих ромашек, свежий вкус шампанского на языке, когда весь Лондон поднял бы бокалы за ее счастье. Ощущение рук ее жениха вокруг нее, когда она броситься его объятие и вздохнет, Да... Да!
Все это было ее фантазиями – каждая последующая еще менее реальная, чем предыдущая –она знала это. В конце концов, двадцативосьмилетняя старая дева была не в том положении, когда отбиваются от ухажеров. Но она точно была в числе тех, кто надеялся, на что то большее чем «Дай нам шанс, ну же?».
Она вздохнула, стараясь не расстроить Томми, который явно прилагал все усилия. Но они были друзьями много лет, и Пенелопа не собиралась начинать врать их дружбе теперь. “Вы сжалились надо мной, не так ли?”
Его глаза расширились от удивления. “Что? Нет! Почему вы так говроите?” Она улыбнулась: «Потому что это правда». «Вы жалеете своего бедного друга, старую деву. И Вы готовы пожертвовать своим собственным счастьем, чтобы быть уверенными, что я выйду замуж». Он посмотрел на нее раздраженным взглядом —взгляд, которым могут обменяться только близкие друзья — он взял ее руки в свои, целуя суставы. «Ерунда. Пришло время пожениться, Пэнни. Ты хороший друг». Он сделал паузу, огорчение, вспыхивало в его дружественном взгляде, и было невозможно сердиться на него. “Я все испортил, не так ли?”
Она не могла сдержаться и улыбнулась. “Совсем чуть-чуть, но, да. Вы, как предполагается, выражаете бессмертную любовь”. Он посмотрел на нее скептически: «Рука ко лбу и все такое?». Ее улыбка перешла в усмешку: «Вот именно. И, может, напишет мне сонет». «О прекрасная Леди Пенелопа… Пожалуйста, обдумайте мое предложение руки и сердца». Она рассмеялась. Томми всегда ее смешил. Это было одним из его достоинств. «Скудная попытка, мой лорд». Он изобразил гримасу. «Как насчет того, если я воспитаю для вас новую породу собак? Назову ее леди П?»
«Действительно романтично», она ответила, «но для этого потребуется очень долгое время, разве вы так не считаете?».
Наступила пауза, они наслаждались компанией друг друга, прежде, чем он сказал, внезапно очень серьезно, Пожалуйста, Пэнни. Позволь мне позаботиться о тебе».
Так как он потерпел неудачу на всех других стадиях предложения руки и сердца, она решила не зацикливаться на словах. Поэтому она решила серьезно обдумать предложение. Он был ее старым другом. Одним из них, по крайней мере. Тем, кто остался ее другом. Он заставлял ее смеяться, и она была очень к нему привязана. Он был единственным джентельменом, который не покинул ее после крайне неудачно разорванной помолвки. Одно это уже делало ему честь. Она должна сказать да. «Скажи это, Пенелопа». В двадцать восемь лет, ей следует стать Леди Томмас Алиес, быть спассеной, в мгновение ока, от вечной участи старой девы. Ну, скажи же это «Да, Томми. Я выйду за тебя замуж». Она должна была это произнести. Но она не произнесла.
* * *
Дорогой М.—
Моя гувернантка не любит угрей. Конечно, она достаточно образованна, что понимать, что принеся одного, это не делает вас плохим человеком. Ненавидьте грех, а не грешника.
Твоя П.
P.S. На прошной неделе Томми приезжал навестить нас, и мы пошли на рыбалку. Он официально мой самый любимый друг.
Поместье Нидхам, Сентябрь 1813.
* * *
Дорогая П.—
Это подозрительно похоже на проповедь преподобного Комптона. Ты была внимательна в церкви. Я разочарован.
—M
P.S—Нет, не он.
Коллежд Энтон, Сентябрь 1813.
Мать Пенелопы появилась на первом этаже лестницы, в одном пролете от Пенелопы, когда звук закрывшейся большой дубовой двери еще отдавался эхом в гостиной.
— Пенелопа! Что ты наделала?- Леди Нидхам сбежала с первого этажа центральной лестницы дома. За ней следовали сестры Пенелопы, Оливия и Филиппа и три охотничьи ее отца.
Пенелопа глубоко вздохнула и повернулась к матери. «Это, действительно, был тихий день»- сказала она, небрежно направляясь в столовую, зная, что мать последует за ней. «Я написала кузине Катарине; Ты знаешь, что она до сихпор страдает от этой ужасной простуды, которую она подхватила перед рождеством?».
Пипа тихо смеялась. Леди Нидхам было не до смеха.
«Меня совершенно не волнует твоя кузина Катарина!» воскликнула маркиза, тон ее голоса повышался вместе с ее беспокойством.
«Это весьма жестоко; никому не нравиться болеть». Когда Пенелопа открыла дверь в столовую, она обнаружила своего отца, сидящего за столом; он все еще был в одежде для охоты, спокойно читая «Пост», ожидая женскую половину дома. «Добрый вечер, отец. У Вас был хороший день?».
«На улице чертовски холодно,» - ответил маркиз Нидхам и Долби , не отрываясь от газеты. «Я думаю, я готов к ужину. Я бы съел что нибудь теплое».
Пенелопа подумала, что ее отец не готов к тому, что произойдет за этим самым ужином. Она подвинула Бигла, сидящего на ее месте, и села на свое место, слева от маркиза и напротив ее сестер. Ее сестры наивно и с любопытством наблюдали, что же произойдет дальше. Она изображала невинность, разворачивая салфетку.
«Пенелопа!» Леди Нидхэм стояла в дверях столовой, с прямой спиной, ее руки, сжатые в кулачки, смущали лакеев, застывших в неуверенности, задаваясь вопросом, надо ли подавать ужин или нет. «Томас сделал предложение!»
«Да. Я там частично присутствовала» ответила Пенелопа.
На этот раз Пипа подняла бокал с водой, что бы прикрыть улыбку.
“Нидхам!» Леди Нидхам решила что ей нужна дополнительная поддержка. «Томас сделал предложение Пенелопе!»
Лорд Нидхам опустил газету: «Неужели? Мне всегда нравился этот Томми Алиес».
Обращая его внимание к своей старшей дочери, он сказал, “Да, Пенелопа?”
Пенелопа глубоко вздохнула. “Не совсем так, Отец”.
“Она не приняла предложение!» Тон, которым говорила ее мать, был уместен только при душераздирающем трауре или для Греческого хора. Хотя у этого была еще одна дополнительная цель - заставить собак лаять.
После того как ее мать и собаки закончили свои вопли, Леди Нидхам подошла к столу. Ее кожа покрылась пятнами, как будто она шла через поле зудящего плюща: «Пенелопа! Предложения руки и сердца от богатых, приемлемых молодых людей не растут на деревьях!».
Особенно, в январе, я так пологаю. Пенелопа даже и не думала говорить в слух то, о чем она думала.
Когда лакей выступил вперед, чтобы подать суп, который должен был быть началом их ужина, леди Нидхэм упала на свой стул и сказала, “Уберите его! Кто может кушать в такое время?”
«Я довольно голодна, вообще-то», заметила Оливия, и Пенелопа попыталась подавить очередную улыбку.
«Нидхэм!»
Маркиз вздохнул и повернулся к Пенелопе. «Ты отказала ему?»
«Не совсем», решила подстраховаться Пенелопа.
«Она не приняла его предложение!», воскликнула Леди Нидхэм.
«Почему нет?».
Это был справедливый вопрос. Это был вопрос, на который все за столом хотели бы знать ответ. Даже сама Пенелопа. Только у нее не было ответа. По крайней мере, вразумительного.
«Я хотела обдумать предложение».
«Не будь глупой. Прими предложение», сказал лорд Нидхэм, как будто сделать это было так же легко как сказать, и махнул лакеем что бы подавали суп.
«Возможно, Пэнни не хочет принимать предложение Томми», заметила Пипа, и Пенелопа, хотела расцеловать свою логически мыслящую младшую сестру.
Тема заблокирована.

Sarah MacLean - A Rogue by Any Other Name - отрыв 21 Апр 2014 15:34 #2

  • MariCova
  • MariCova аватар
  • Не в сети
  • Luero
  • Сообщений: 3
  • Репутация: 0
sorry,translation
Тема заблокирована.

Sarah MacLean - A Rogue by Any Other Name - отрыв 21 Апр 2014 21:03 #3

  • So-chan
  • So-chan аватар
  • Не в сети
  • Переводчик, Редактор
  • Сообщений: 2029
  • Спасибо получено: 3879
  • Репутация: 127
MariCova, начну с замечаний по оформлению.

Главное правило:

Прямая речь персонажей в английских языке заключается в кавычки, но в в русском другие правила, что касается оформление диалога. У нас прямая речь начинается с новой строчки и с обязательного тире перед словами. Кавычки у нас тоже есть, но основное правило для нас - правило оформления диалога. Здесь про это: www.gramota.ru/class/coach/punct/45_192

Второе главное правило:

Все титулы, звания, чины, должности в русском пишутся с букв строчных (исключение, прозвища). Никаких Леди, Виконтов, Маркизов быть не может. И уж тем более со строчной пишется названия месяцев.

А теперь касаемо замечаний по переводу - многое упускаете в смысле.

Вот возьмем начало. Письма. Название не будем трогать. Оно довольно сложное, и при переводе на русский двойной пласт смысла вряд ли передать.

Ладно, вернемся к письмам. У вас:

Dear M—
You absolutely must come home. It’s dreadfully boring without you; neither Victoria nor Valerie makes for a sound lakeside companion.
Are you very sure that you must attend school? My governess seems fairly intelligent. I’m sure she can teach you anything you need know.
Yrs—P
Needham Manor, September 1813

Дорогой М,
Ты, безусловно, должен приехать. Без тебя здесь ужасно скучно; Виктория и Валерия неподходящая компания для прогулок у озера.
Ты уверен, что тебе нужно посещать школу? Моя гувернантка мне кажется достаточно образованной. Я уверенна, она может тебя научить всему, что тебе нужно знать.
Твоя П.
Поместье Нидхам, Сентябрь 1813.

Вот к примеру, зачем come home размазывать более расплывчатым "приехать", чем уж "вернуться домой" плохо. Также во втором предложении размазано почему именно из Виктории и Валерии неподходящая компания.
Стилистическая окраска absolutely must (просто обязан, должен) и you very sure (точно уверен) не переданы. Но ладно, вернемся пока к предложениям.



Dear P—
I’m afraid you’re in for dreadful boredom until Christmas. If it is any consolation, I don’t even have access to a lake. May I suggest teaching the twins to fish?
I’m sure I must attend school . . . your governess is not fond of me.
—M
Eton College, September 1813

Дорогя П.,
Я боюсь, тебе будет ужасно скучно до Рождества. Если тебя это утешит, у нас тут даже озера нет. Может, научишь близняшек рыбачить?
М.
Коллежд Энтон, Сентябрь 1813.


При переводе потеряно целое предложение (I’m sure I must attend school . . . your governess is not fond of me). И в английском ничего не говорится о том, что озера у них нет (просто парень не может на него сходить)

Eton College - это Итонский колледж. Реально существующее учебное заведение. Такие вещи нужно научиться проверять.


Первое предложение опустим. Переведено он верно, вот только его получше отредактировать надо.


She knew that half of London would think her not entirely out of bounds if she were to join The Honorable Mr. Thomas Alles on one knee and thank him and her maker for the very kind and exceedingly generous offer. After all, the gentleman in question was handsome, friendly, and had all his teeth and a full head of hair—a rare combination of traits for a not-so-young woman with a broken engagement and only a handful of suitors in her past.

Она знала, что пол Лондона не сочло бы ее выжившей из ума, если бы она присоединилась к уважаемому мистеру Томасу Элиасу встав на одно колено рядом с ним, в благодарность за его чрезвычайно щедрое предложение. В конце концов, упомянутый джентльмен был красив, дружелюбен, все зубы у него были на месте и полная копна волос- редкое сочетание этих качеств для не совсем уж молодой девушки с неудавшейся помолвкой и совсем небольшим количеством ухажеров в прошлом.


Пол Лондона - не дело. Или половина Лондона или пол-Лондона. Другого написания не дано.
С Honorable не передан сарказм. thank him and her maker, the very kind and exceedingly generous offer - кусочки выкинуты. "был красив, дружелюбен, все зубы у него были на месте и полная копна волос" - некрасиво. А дальше "редкое сочетание этих качеств для не совсем уж молодой девушки". Выходит, качества эти сочетаются в девушке, а не в мужчине.


Ладно, час поздний на дворе. Скажу так, с текстом пока нужно очень много работать. Претензии и к оформлению, и к переводу. И главное, вы пока не передали весьма саркастичный настрой книги. Нету в вашем отрывке у книги лица.

Так что работайте над отрывком и дальше дерзайте.
Тема заблокирована.
Спасибо сказали: Solitary-angel